Biographies
(This page is a work in progress)

Keynote Speakers:

Dr. Pramod Khargonekar, Assistant Director, Directorate for Engineering, National Science Foundation

Dr. Khargonekar

Dr. Pramod P. Khargonekar was appointed by the National Science Foundation (NSF) to serve as Assistant Director for the Directorate of Engineering (ENG) in March 2013. In this position, Khargonekar leads the ENG Directorate with an annual budget of more than $800 million. The ENG Directorate invests in frontier engineering research and education, cultivates an innovation ecosystem, and develops the next-generation of engineers. He is a member of the senior leadership team at NSF and thereby involved in setting priorities and policies at NSF.

Khargonekar received B. Tech. Degree in electrical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, India, in 1977, and M.S. degree in mathematics and Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Florida in 1980 and 1981, respectively.  He has held faculty positions at the University of Florida, University of Minnesota, and The University of Michigan. He was Chairman of the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from 1997 to 2001 and also held the position of Claude E. Shannon Professor of Engineering Science at The University of Michigan.  From 2001 to 2009, he was Dean of the College of Engineering and is currently Eckis Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Florida. He also served briefly as Deputy Director of Technology at ARPA-E, U. S. Department of Energy in 2012-13.

 


Dr. Erwin Gianchandani, Acting Deputy Assistant Director, Directorate for Computer & Information Science & Engineering, National Science Foundation

Dr. Erwin Gianchandani is the Acting Deputy Assistant Director of the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) at the National Science Foundation (NSF), where he contributes to all aspects of the directorate’s management, including strategic planning and oversight of day-to-day operations. Most recently, Dr. Gianchandani has been the deputy division director for the CISE Division of Computer and Network Systems (CNS). Before joining NSF in 2012, Dr. Gianchandani served as the inaugural director of the Computing Community Consortium (CCC), providing leadership to the computing research community in identifying and pursuing audacious, high-impact research directions. Prior to the CCC, Dr. Gianchandani was an AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellow at NSF and contributed to the establishment of NSF’s smart health and wellbeing program. Previously, he was director of innovation networking at the University of Virginia, reporting to the university’s vice president for research. Dr. Gianchandani has published extensively and presented at numerous international conferences on the subject of computational systems modeling of cellular reaction networks, with the goal of better understanding disease mechanisms and identifying therapeutic targets. Dr. Gianchandani received his Ph.D. in biomedical engineering, M.S. in biomedical engineering, and B.S. in computer science from the University of Virginia.

 


Dr. Phil Fleming, CTO, North America Nokia Networks

Dr. Phil FlemingDr. Phil Fleming is Chief Technology Officer of North America at Nokia Networks. He earned his Ph.D. in Mathematics from the University of Michigan, after which he worked for nine years (1982-1991) at Bell Labs as a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff (DMTS). For the next two decades Dr. Fleming led a team of researchers and advanced technologists in designing and developing innovative solutions in packet scheduling and radio receiver/transmitters for WiMAX and LTE as a Fellow of the Technical Staff and Senior Director at Motorola Solutions. In 2011 he joined Nokia Solutions and Networks to be their head of Advanced Radio Technology and Engineering, and later head of Advanced Technology. Currently at CTO, Dr. Fleming looks for opportunities for research and strategic collaborations with telecom technologists in North America and worldwide.

 

 


 

Steering Committee Members:

 

Dr. William Lehr:

Dr. William Lehr is a telecommunications/Internet industry economist and policy analyst with over 20 years as an academic researcher and industry consultant. He is a research scientist in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology engaged in multidisciplinary research on the economic and policy challenges confronting the evolving Internet ecosystem. Dr. Lehr is engaged in a range of industry-academic research projects focusing on the economic and policy implications of key Internet trends such as the rise of mobile broadband and wireless innovation, the implications of Big Data for evidence-based decision-making, and the security and identity management challenges of transitioning to future Internet architectures. In addition to his academic research, Dr. Lehr provides business strategy and policy advice to public and private sector clients in the U.S. and abroad. Dr. Lehr holds a Ph.D. in Economics from Stanford, an M.B.A. from the Wharton Graduate School, and M.S.E., B.S. and B.A. (1979) degrees from the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Lehr will also be the Panel Moderator for the first Summary Breakout Session on Monday, Oct. 19 and panel member on Panel 3: Grand Challenges Relevant to EARS: Problems That Need to be Addressed by Large Teams with Significant Resources.

 


Dr. Jerry Park:

Dr. ParkJerry Park received a Ph.D. degree in electrical and computer engineering from Purdue University in 2003. He is currently a professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech, and the Site Director of a National Science Foundation (NSF) Industry-University Cooperative Research Center (I-UCRC) called Broadband Wireless Access & Applications Center (BWAC). As the site director of BWAC at Virginia Tech, Park is leading several sponsored research projects on wireless networks and network security. Dr. Park is also director of the Advanced Research in Information Assurance and Security Lab (ARIAS), and Associate Director for Affiliate Relations of the Wireless @ Virginia Tech Research Group. Dr. Park is widely recognized for his pioneering work on enforcement and security problems in cognitive radio networks and spectrum sharing. Dr. Park is a co-PI on the 2nd Enchancing Access to the Radio Spectrum (EARS) Workshop.

 



Dr. Jeff Reed:

Dr. ReedDr. Jeffrey H. Reed is the Willis G. Worcester Professor in the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. He currently serves as Founding Director of Wireless@Virginia Tech, one of the largest and most comprehensive university wireless research groups in the US which he founding in 2006 and served as its first director. In 2010, he founded the Ted and Karyn Hume Center for National Security and Technology and served as its Interim Director. Dr. Reed is co-founder of Cognitive Radio Technologies (CRT), a company that is commercializing of the cognitive radio technologies produced for military applications, Federated Wireless, a company that is developing spectrum sharing technologies; and for PFP Cybersecurity, a company that specializes in security for embedded systems, including Android platforms. He has also served as a consultant for approximately thirty organizations, covering topics such as merger evaluation, network neutrality, and band planning. Dr. Reed served on the President’s Council of Advisor in Science and Technology (PCAST) Advisory Group on how to transition federal spectrum for commercial economic benefits. In 2014, Dr. Reed was selected to be a member of CSMAC, the advisory group on spectrum issues for the US Department of Commerce. In 2014, Dr. Reed served as co-general chair for the IEEE Dynamic Spectrum Access Network (DySPAN) conference. Dr. Reed is the PI on the 2nd Enhancing Access to the Radio Spectrum Workshop, and will also serve as one of two panel moderators on Panel 3: Grand Challenges Relevant to EARS: Problems That Need to be Addressed by Large Teams with Significant Resources

 


Dr. Akbar Sayeed

Akbar M. Sayeed is a Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and heads the Wireless Communications and Sensing Laboratory. He received the B.S. degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1991, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1993 and 1996, all in Electrical and Computer Engineering. He was a postdoctoral fellow at Rice University from 1996 to 1997. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, and has served the IEEE in a number of capacities, including as a member of Technical Committees, Guest Editor for special issues, Associate Editor, and as a Technical Program Co-chair for workshops and conferences. His research interests include wireless communications, channel modeling, statistical signal processing, communication and information theory, time-frequency analysis, machine learning, and applications in wireless communication and sensor networks. A focus of current research is the development of basic theory and system architectures for emerging 5G wireless technologies, including millimeter-wave and high-dimensional multi-antenna systems. This effort also involves prototype development, channel measurements, and technology transfer. Dr. Sayeed is also a panel member on Panel 3, Grand Challenges Relevant to EARS: Problems That Need to be Addressed by Large Teams with Significant Resources

 


Dr. Laura Woodney

Coming Soon

 

Panel Moderators and Members and Breakout Session Leaders

Jennifer Bernhard, University of Illinois, Panel 3 Moderator:

Jennifer BernhardJennifer Bernhard is currently a professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Associate Dean for Research in the College of Engineering at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. She has been a faculty member in the Electromagnetics Laboratory in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Illinois since 1999. Her research group focuses on the development and analysis of multifunctional reconfigurable antennas and their system-level benefits as well as the development of antenna synthesis and packaging techniques for electrically small, planar, and integrated antennas for wireless sensor and communication systems. In addition to the NSF CAREER Award, the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society H. A. Wheeler Prize Paper Award and other research recognitions, she has been honored with a number of teaching and advising awards. In 2008-2009, Prof. Bernhard was a member of the Defense Science Study Group, sponsored by DARPA. In 2010, she co-chaired the National Science Foundation Workshop on Enhancing Access to the Radio Spectrum (EARS). She also served on the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) Working Group on Realizing the Full Potential of Government-Held Spectrum to Spur Economic Growth in 2011-2012. She is a Fellow of the IEEE, and in 2008, she served as the President of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society. Dr. Bernhard received her Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Duke University.

 


Millind Buddhikot, Alcatel-Lucent, Panel 1 Member and Panel 2 Moderator:

Milind Buddhikot Milind M. Buddhikot is currently a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff (DMTS) in Alcatel-Lucent Bell Laboratories, where he conducts research in next generation of wireless networks.   In a research career spanning 22+ years, he has made significant contributions, scientifically as well as to the business aspects of wireless, IP and multi-media networking.
Milind’s recent work is in the area of high capacity wireless networks, in particular small cells that exploit shared spectrum via dynamic spectrum access (DSA) technologies.  He has authored 45+ technical papers and holds 15 US or international patents. According to Google Scholar, Milind’s research publications have recorded 5000+ citations and are well recognized within the research community.  Two concepts he pioneered and researched, namely the concept of database coordinated dynamic spectrum access (2004) and ultra-broadband small cells using shared spectrum (2009) have now emerged as promising new technology and spectrum policy directions.
Milind is a recipient of the Bell Labs President's Silver Award for outstanding innovations and contributions (2003), Bell Labs Team Award (2003), Lucent Chairman's Team Award (2006) and DMTS award (2012). Milind is a co-founder of the IEEE DySPAN symposium which has emerged as a premier conference on the topic of Dynamic Spectrum Access. He has served as an Associate Editor of IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking and Elsevier’s Computer Networks Journal, secured 1.2+ million dollars in research funding and regularly participates in FCC, NSF and conference panels and TPC committees of major IEEE and ACM conferences. Milind has frequently delivered invited presentations and tutorials on future technology directions to audiences in top-tier research forums and trade shows and to business customers world-wide. Dr. Buddhikot is one of two panel moderators for Panel 2: Spectrum-Related Challenges Faced by the Wireless Industry.

 


James Buckwalter, University of California - Santa Barbara, Breakout Session 1A Leader:

James F. Buckwalter (S’01-M’06-SM’13) received the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, in 2006. He is currently a Professor of electrical and computer engineering with the University of California - Santa Barbara (UCSB), Santa Barbara. From 2006-2014, he was an Assistant and Associate Professor with the University of California – San Diego (UCSD), La Jolla. From 1999 to 2000, he was a Research Scientist with Telcordia Technologies. During Summer 2004, he was with the IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY. In 2006, he joined Luxtera, Carlsbad, CA. In July 2006, he joined the faculty of UCSD as an Assistant Professor. Dr. Buckwalter was the recipient of a 2004 IBM Ph.D. Fellowship, 2007 Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Young Faculty Award, 2011 NSF CAREER Award, and 2015 IEEE MTT-S Young Engineer Award

 


Andy Clegg, Google, Panel 1 Member and Panel 2 Moderator:

Dr. CleggAndrew Clegg is the Spectrum Engineering Lead for Google. He is presently focused primarily on identifying spectrum sharing opportunities for commercial wireless networks. Prior to joining Google, he served as the spectrum manager for the U.S. National Science Foundation. At NSF, he founded the Enhancing Access to the Radio Spectrum (EARS) program, a funding program dedicated to supporting academic and small business research focused on improving spectrum efficiency and access. Prior to NSF, he was a Lead Member of Technical Staff at what is now AT&T Mobility. He has over 25 years of experience in national and international spectrum management for both government and commercial applications, and was a member of the U.S. delegation to two World Radiocommunication Conferences.

Andy holds a PhD in radio astronomy (major) and electrical engineering (minor) from Cornell University, and a BA in physics and astronomy, with highest distinction, from the University of Virginia.

 


Sandra Cruz-Pol, University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez, Breakout Session 2A Leader:

Sandra Cruz-PolSandra Cruz-Pol is a Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez since 1991. She was the NSF Program Director for the EARS program and was also a Spectrum Manager. As part of her job at NSF within the Electromagnetic Spectrum Division in 2014-15, she was appointed the NSF Representative to the IRAC and was a member of the U.S. Delegation at the ITU Radiocommunication meetings in Geneva.  She obtained her Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Pennsylvania State University working with passive satellite sensors in the Ku, K and Ka bands for the calibration of absorption models of atmospheric gases and the sea surface emissivity model using satellite radiometer and ground-based radiometers and ancillary global data. She worked with polarimetric radars and ocean K-band radars at UMass.

Her research interests include microwave remote sensing (active and passive) of the Earth, and she has worked on several projects sponsored by NSF (ERC and MRI programs), including a DCAS Doppler Polarimetric Weather radar Network and an Off-the-Grid- (OTG) X-band weather radar network, both deployed on the western part of the island of Puerto Rico to study tropical weather on complex terrain. She worked in the NASA (TCESS) Tropical Center for Earth and Space Sciences project for several years. She was a member of National Academies’ Committee on Radio Frequencies (CORF) from 2010 to 2014. Dr. Cruz-Pol is a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society (GRSS), and the Tau Beta Pi and Phi Kappa Phi Honor Societies. She was the Associate Editor for University Affairs for the IEEE GRSS Newsletter for 5 years. She was the counselor for the student chapter of the IEEE in UPRM, the largest in IEEE Region 9. She has been a recipient of NASA, GEM, NSF-GEE and GTE Fellowships. She has also spent time as a researcher at AT&T Laboratories, Lincroft, NJ, and Middletown, NJ.

 


Pierre de Vries, University of Colorado, Moderator, Panel 1:

Pierre de VriesPierre de Vries is a Senior Adjunct Fellow and Co-Director of the Spectrum Policy Initiative at the Silicon Flatirons Center for Law, Technology, and Entrepreneurship at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He researches the intersection between technology, commerce and government policy. His current work focuses on ways to maximize the value of radio operation, e.g. by improving the allocation of the rights and responsibilities of wireless systems, and decentralizing spectrum management decisions. Dr. de Vries is the moderator for Panel 1: Regulatory Spectrum Policies & the Government's Spectrum Needs.

 

 


Phil Fleming, Nokia Networks, Panel 2 Member, Keynote Speaker:

Phil FlemingPhil Fleming is CTO of the North America for Nokia Networks. He has broad experience in wireless communication technologies and special expertise in converting research and advanced technology concepts into business value for wireless equipment suppliers and operators. He currently holds 20 U.S. patents and he is co-author on 12 journal publications and 20+ conference papers in a variety of technology areas related to wireless communications. Dr. Fleming earned his Ph.D. in Mathematics from the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor) in 1981 and started his engineering career in 1982 at Bell Laboratories where he was named Distinguished Member of the Technical Staff in 1990. He joined Motorola in 1991 and was awarded the title Dan Noble Fellow in 2007. While at Motorola, he was Fellow of the Technical Staff and Senior Director of the Advanced Radio Technology and Engineering team from 2005 to 2011 in the Network Advanced Technologies organization and was responsible for radio access standards, algorithms and advanced RAN development of WiMAX and LTE. In 2011, he and his team joined Nokia Network’s CTO office where they designed and developed advanced radio access algorithms and architectures, most recently focused on dense radio deployments such as urban centers, stadiums and other special venues. He was the lead technologist and inventor of Nokia’s Centralized RAN which has won a number of industry awards including the 2014 Leading Lights Award for “Best Mobile Product.”  In January 2013, he was appointed Head of the Advanced Technologies group in NSN’s Technology and Innovations organization responsible for acceleration of research and forward-looking concepts into products across Nokia Networks business lines.

 


Edward Knightly, Rice University, Breakout Session 4A Leader:

Edward KnightlyEdward Knightly is a professor and the department chair of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Rice University in Houston, Texas. He received his Ph.D. and M.S. from the University of California at Berkeley and his B.S. from Auburn University. He is an IEEE Fellow, a Sloan Fellow, and a recipient of the National Science Foundation CAREER Award. He received best paper awards from ACM MobiCom, IEEE SECON, and the IEEE Workshop on Cognitive Radio Architectures for Broadband. He has chaired ACM MobiHoc, ACM MobiSys, IEEE INFOCOM, and IEEE SECON. He serves as an editor-at-large for IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking and serves on the IMDEA Networks Scientific Council.

Professor Knightly’s research interests are in the areas of mobile and wireless networks with a focus on protocol design, performance evaluation, and at-scale field trials. He leads the Rice Networks Group. The group’s current projects include deployment, operation, and management of a large-scale urban wireless network in a Houston under-resourced community. This network, Technology For All (TFA) Wireless, is serving over 4,000 users in several square kilometers and employs custom-built programmable and observable access points. The network is the first to provide residential access in frequencies spanning from unused UHF TV bands to legacy WiFi bands (500 MHz to 5 GHz). His group developed the first multi-user beam-forming WLAN system that demonstrates a key performance feature provided by IEEE 802.11ac. His group also co-developed a clean-slate-design hardware platform for high-performance wireless networks, TAPs and WARP.


J. Nicholas Laneman, University of Notre Dame, Breakout Session 3B Leader:

Dr. LanemanJ. Nicholas Laneman is Founding Director of the Wireless Institute in the College of Engineering, a Professor of Electrical Engineering, and a Fellow of the John J. Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values at the University of Notre Dame. He joined the faculty in August 2002 shortly after earning a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). His research and teaching interests are in communication systems engineering, with emphasis on wireless systems. In addition to three conference best paper awards, Laneman has received a 2006 Presidential Early-Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), a 2006 National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Award, a 2003 Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) Ralph E. Powe Junior Faculty Enhancement Award, and the 2001 MIT EECS Harold L. Hazen Graduate Teaching Award. He is an IEEE Fellow and has served as an Associate Editor for IEEE Transactions on Communications, as a Guest Editor for Special Issues of IEEE Transactions on Information Theory and IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications, and as the first Online Editor for the IEEE Information Theory Society. Laneman is author or co-author on over 120 publications, including 40 journal articles and 3 invited book chapters, and has been recognized by Thomson Reuters as an ISI Highly Cited Researcher (2015, 2010). He is co-inventor on 6 U.S. patents and has several patents pending.

 


John Leibovitz, FCC, Panel 1 Member:

John Leibovitz has played an integral role in driving spectrum and wireless policy for the FCC. He helped formulate a comprehensive spectrum strategy for the United States, first as spectrum team lead for the National Broadband Plan and more recently as Special Advisor to the Chairman for Spectrum Policy. As Deputy Chief of the Wireless Bureau, he has supervised implementation of this strategy and other wireless policies.

 


Bruce Mueller, Motorola Solutions, Breakout Session 3 B Leader:

Bruce MuellerBruce Mueller leads Wireless Research for the CTO office in Motorola Solutions.   While at Motorola, he has been instrumental in inventing, prototyping and realizing the key technologies behind 2G, 3G and 4G cellular systems, cable data and telephony solutions, and numerous other wireless platforms.  An inventor with 22 issued patents, he is active in developing the next generation of mission critical connectivity for first responders and public networks.   When wearing his futurist hat, Bruce also collaborates with technology startups, university research and external agencies to connect them with MSI to enable the future of critical communications.

Bruce joined Motorola Solutions 26 years ago after graduating with a BSEE from Rose Hulman Institute of Technology and a MSEE from the University of Michigan.

Bruce is a proud 'maker' with a wide spectrum of interests in electronics, robotics and education.  He is active with FIRST Robotics, the Boy Scouts of America, and numerous other educational activities in the Chicagoland area.

 


James Neel, Federated Wireless, Breakout Session 4B Leader:

James Neel Dr. James (Jody) Neel is the Principal Investigator for Federated Wireless's research programs. Federated Wireless is developing a dynamic Spectrum Access System (SAS) platform that will provide cost-effective spectrum to extend wireless carrier network access and scale where coverage is needed most. Dr. Neel earned his PhD. in Electrical Engineering from Virginia Tech and has fifteen years experience leading the research, design, and prototyping of cognitive radio systems spanning his time at Virginia Tech, Cognitive Radio Technologies, and Federated Wireless. He has received three paper awards on the design of cognitive radio algorithms and systems, is the Chair of the Cognitive Radio Work Group in the Wireless Innovation Forum, and help organize and contributes to the Wireless Innovation Forum's (WINNF) committee for standardizing radar / communications coexistence at 3550 MHz.

 


Peter Tenhula, NTIA, Panel 1 Member, Breakout Session 4B Leader:

Peter TenhulaPeter Tenhula is the Deputy Associate Administrator for Spectrum Management in the Office of Spectrum Management (OSM) at the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA). As the Deputy Associate Administrator for Spectrum Management, Mr. Tenhula develops and implements initiatives in the highly complex technical area of radiocommunications and management of the Federal Government’s use of the radio frequency spectrum. Prior to joining OSM in October 2014, he was a Senior Advisor in NTIA’s Office of the Assistant Secretary where he advised the Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Communications and Information, OSM, and the Institute for Telecommunication Sciences on spectrum policy matters. Before joining NTIA in 2012, Mr. Tenhula worked at Shared Spectrum Company in Vienna, Virginia, for six years, serving as the company’s Vice President and General Counsel. He was also was a member of the Board of Directors of the Wireless Innovation Forum (formerly the SDR Forum) and chaired the forum’s Regulatory Committee. From 1990 to 2006, Mr. Tenhula served at the Federal Communications Commission, where he held several positions including Acting Deputy Chief of the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau, Director of the Spectrum Policy Task Force, Senior Legal Advisor to Chairman Michael Powell, Special Counsel to General Counsel William Kennard, and staff attorney in the Office of General Counsel and the Mass Media Bureau. Mr. Tenhula received his undergraduate degree in telecommunications from Indiana University, Bloomington, and earned a law degree from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. Peter Tenhula is the Deputy Associate Administrator for Spectrum Management in the Office of Spectrum Management (OSM) at the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA). As the Deputy Associate Administrator for Spectrum Management, Mr. Tenhula develops and implements initiatives in the highly complex technical area of radiocommunications and management of the Federal Government’s use of the radio frequency spectrum. Prior to joining OSM in October 2014, he was a Senior Advisor in NTIA’s Office of the Assistant Secretary where he advised the Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Communications and Information, OSM, and the Institute for Telecommunication Sciences on spectrum policy matters. Before joining NTIA in 2012, Mr. Tenhula worked at Shared Spectrum Company in Vienna, Virginia, for six years, serving as the company’s Vice President and General Counsel. He was also was a member of the Board of Directors of the Wireless Innovation Forum (formerly the SDR Forum) and chaired the forum’s Regulatory Committee. From 1990 to 2006, Mr. Tenhula served at the Federal Communications Commission, where he held several positions including Acting Deputy Chief of the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau, Director of the Spectrum Policy Task Force, Senior Legal Advisor to Chairman Michael Powell, Special Counsel to General Counsel William Kennard, and staff attorney in the Office of General Counsel and the Mass Media Bureau. Mr. Tenhula received his undergraduate degree in telecommunications from Indiana University, Bloomington, and earned a law degree from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri.

 


Dipankar Raychaudhuri, Rutgers University, Breakout Session 1B Leader:

Dipankar Raychaudhuri is Distinguished Professor, Electrical & Computer Engineering and Director, WINLAB (Wireless Information Network Lab) at Rutgers University. As WINLAB's Director, he is responsible for an internationally recognized industry-university research center specializing in wireless technology. He is also PI for several large U.S. National Science Foundation funded grants including the "ORBIT" wireless testbed and the “MobilityFirst” future Internet architecture project. Dr. Raychaudhuri has previously held corporate R&D positions including: Chief Scientist, Iospan Wireless (2000-01), AGM & Dept Head, NEC Laboratories (1993-99) and Head, Broadband Communications, Sarnoff Corp (1990-92). He obtained the B.Tech (Hons) from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur in 1976 and the M.S. and Ph.D degrees from SUNY, Stony Brook in 1978, 79. He is a Fellow of the IEEE.

 


Dennis Roberson, Vice Provost, Illinois Institute of Technology, Panel 2 Member:

Dr. RobersonDennis Roberson has been Vice Provost and Research Professor with the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) since June 2003.  At IIT he established a new undergraduate business school, a wireless research center (WiNCom), IIT's corporate relations initiative, and is currently responsible the latter two efforts. He is also responsible for IIT's Research efforts, strategic plan assessment, its externally focused entrepreneurial efforts and the technology commercialization office. Professor Roberson is also President, CEO and Member of Roberson and Associates, LLC, a technology and management consulting firm serving a variety of government and commercial customers since 2008.

Prior to IIT, Professor Roberson was Executive Vice President and Chief Technical Officer of Motorola, Inc. Through his career he has held senior executive positions with NCR Corporation, AT&T, Digital Equipment Corp. (now part of Hewlett Packard) and IBM. Professor Roberson is a Director of Advanced Diamond Technologies, Cleversafe, Caerus Institute, OnKol and SonSet Solutions, and serves on the Technical Advisory Committees of several other firms.  He chairs the U.S. Federal Communication Commission's Technological Advisory Council and serves on the U.S. Commerce Department's Commerce Spectrum Management Advisory Committee (CSMAC). He has served as an invited expert for the development of the PCAST Spectrum Policy Report, the Board of Directors of FIRST Robotics, the National Advisory Council for the Boy Scouts of America, the Board of Singapore’s Agency for Science, Technology and Research, and as an International Advisory Panel member for the Prime Minister of Malaysia. He holds Bachelor of Science Degrees in Physics and Electrical Engineering from Washington State University and a Master of Science in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University.

 


Anant Sahai, University of California, Berkeley, Breakout Session 2B Leader:

Anant SahaiAnant did his undergraduate work in EECS at UC Berkeley from 1990-1994. From 1994-2000 he was a graduate student at MIT studying Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (Course 6 in MIT-speak) and was based in the Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems. In 2001 he was on the theoretical/algorithmic side of a team at the startup Enuvis, Inc. developing new adaptive software radio techniques for GPS in very low SNR environments (such as those encountered indoors in urban areas). He joined the Berkeley faculty in 2002.

He currently serves also as faculty adviser to UC Berkeley's chapter of Eta Kappa Nu. He has previously served as the Treasurer for the IEEE Information Theory Society. ('07-'09 inclusive) His research interests span information theory, decentralized control, and wireless communication --- with a particular interest at the intersections of these fields. Within wireless communication, he is particularly interested in Spectrum Sharing and Cognitive Radio.


 

Martin Weiss, University of Pittsburgh, Breakout Session 3A Leader

Dr. WeissMartin B.H. Weiss is Professor of Telecommunications and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Research at the School of Information Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh, where he also holds a faculty appointment in telecommunications.  He earned his PhD. in Engineering and Public Policy from Carnegie Mellon University where he studied the standards development process under Professor Marvin A. Sirbu.  He also earned an MSE in Computer, Control, and Information Engineering from the University of Michigan and a BSE in Electrical Engineering from Northeastern University.  His overall research theme is the analysis of situations where competing firms must cooperate technically; this has expressed itself in studying the standardization process, internet interconnection, and, most recently, radio spectrum sharing

His industrial experience includes technical and professional work at several R&D and consulting firms in the United States.  From 1978 to 1981, he was a Member of the Technical Staff at Bell Laboratories; from 1983 to 1985, he was a Member of the Technical Staff at the MITRE Corp; and from 1985 to 1987 he was a Senior Consultant with Deloitte, Haskins, and Sells.  He continues to consult with national and international firms, serving as an advisor, analyst and expert witness.

He is the co-author of two books and has written numerous book chapters, major conference papers and refereed journal papers in the area of standards setting, internet interconnection, and dynamic spectrum access.  He has been invited to serve on numerous expert panels for industry, government and academia.

 


Charlize Zhang, Samsung, Panel 2 Member:

Charlie ZhangCharlie Zhang is a VP and head of Standards and Research Lab with Samsung Research America at Dallas, where he leads research and standards for 5G cellular systems and next generation multimedia networks. From Aug 2009 to Aug 2013, he served as the Vice Chairman of the 3GPP RAN1 working group and led development of LTE and LTE-Advanced technologies such as 3D channel modeling, UL-MIMO and CoMP, Carrier Aggregation for TD-LTE, etc. Before joining Samsung, he was with Motorola from 2006 to 2007 working on 3GPP HSPA standards, and with Nokia Research Center from 2001 to 2006 working on IEEE 802.16e (WiMAX) standard and EDGE/CDMA receiver algorithms. He received his Ph.D. degree from University of Wisconsin, Madison.